JCH PAN 400

Full development stats:

  • Rodinol 1+50, 20ºc. 22 minutes. Agitate every 30s for 15s
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+9 for 1 minute constant agitation
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4 for 10 minutes
  • Wash for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol Wetting agent 1+400 in deionised water for 1m. No agitation.

I am in love with JCH 400. The results are outstanding. Great tonal range, contrast, sharpness and grain. This film was shot during the London snowy period (Feb 2018) and the following week (1st week of March).

 

Bergger Pancro 400

Full development stats:

  • Rodinol 1+25, 20ºc. 8 minutes. Agitate every 30s for 15s
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+9 for 1 minute constant agitation
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4 for 10 minutes
  • Wash for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol Wetting agent 1+400 in deionised water for 1m. No agitation.

I took a roll of Bergger Pancro out to Kew Gardens. The results are interesting, I was not expecting so much grain. The research I have done on this film (Flickr, Wiki, Google) showed the images to be fairly fine grain for this speed. The wide shots are fairly standard with no remarkable features but where this film has stood out is on the close ups. The grain and contrast definitely compliment the photograph.

I am unsure why there was so much grain, I followed the develop instructions from the box. I bought this roll from eBay so am suspicious I have bought an out of date roll or a cassette which is not Bergger but labelled as such and the film inside is a crappy coated emulsion?

Kentmere 100 pushed 1600

I decided to go crazy and push a roll of Kentmere 100 to 1600iso.

It took a while to decide which development time I should go for. Kodak, Ilford, Adox and various forums all suggest different timings. I was reading from one commenter to double the timings plus 20%. The Massive DevChart has a rough guide on how to work out timings when pushing however did not extend to four stops. I decided on Rodinol 1+100 at 120 minutes, 20ºc. The first 5 minutes I agitated the soup every 30s for 15s. After 30 minutes I agitated for 15s.

Full development stats:

  • Rodinol 1+100, 20ºc. 120 minutes. Agitate every 30s for 15s for 5 minutes. Stand for 30m, agitate 15s, stand.
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+9 for 1 minute constant agitation
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4 for 12 minutes
  • Wash for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol Wetting agent 1+400 in deionised water for 1m. Gentle agitation.

I must admit when I pulled the negative out of the soup I was expecting a series of black frames from either the contrast going crazy or from over developing. I peeled back the first few frames to check the fix and to my surprise saw some well developed shots!

Kentmere 100 is rated best between 50-200 ISO….. so I was expecting a lot of grain….once I dried and scanned the negative I was blown away how detailed the shots are. The grain is fairly small and overall contrast not as intense as I expected. The night time/darker photos are when I was drunk on a night out and was underexposing instead of overexposing. The daytime photographs on the street I overexposed by at least a stop.

There is change in the contrast levels of each photo, some pictures (such as the swimming pool shot) have a lot of grey tone without much highlight and shadow whereas other pictures are more contrasty.

I will push this film beyond four stops in the future to see how far it will go and still give me useable shots.

Lucky SHD 100 push to 200

  • Rodinol 1+25 for 9m 30s minutes at 20ºc. Agitate for 30s then every 30s for 15s.
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+19, 20ºc, constant agitation for 1 minute
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4, 20ºc for 9 minutes
  • Wash for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol Wetting Agent 1+400 deionised water. Leave to soak for 30s rinse off any bubbles using deionised water
  • Hang dry for 2 hours
  • Scan using Plustek 8200i
  • Crop 6×4
  • Curves
  • Clean
  • Upload

This is the first time I have shot with Lucky 100 and I am very pleased with the results. I was surprised how much detail I was able to read from the negative as quite a few photographs looked washed out, as a result the contrast was fairly flat, even though pushed. The final photographs uploaded have been worked in Lightroom.

I try to retain as many aesthetic features of the film type I am shooting however on this occasion I made adjustments to achieve the best image overall as the contrast was too flat for the effect I was going for.

I used the recommended development times from DevChart. Next time I will add an extra 2-4 minutes on to the developer to see how this affects the negative on Lucky 100.

One thing I found frustrating is there are no identifiable marks on the negative. No frame numbers, film type etc. This may be me nit picking but I like having frame numbers next to my shot so I can correlate that to my digital archive. The plastic used for the negative feels flimsier than the Kentmere 400 which is hanging on the left in the photograph above. The negative also curls easily even when dried straight for two hours, I have not experienced this amount of curling once dried from any other film I have shot, ever.

I love the Lucky 100 film. It’s produced some strong black and whites with detail in the shadows and highlights, images are sharp with an un-intrusive grain. A bonus to having a low contrast negative is the massive tonal range and control in post with where I wanted contrast.

Kentmere 400

  • Rodinol 1+50 for 20 minutes at 20ºc. Agitate for 30s then every 30s for 15s.
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+19, 20ºc, constant agitation for 1 minute
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4, 20ºc for 9 minutes
  • Wash for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol Wetting Agent 1+400 deionised water. Leave to soak for 30s rinse off any bubbles using deionised water
  • Hang dry for 2 hours
  • Scan using Plustek 8200i (negafix profile Ilford Delta 400 as no Kentmere available)
  • Crop 6×4
  • Curves
  • Clean
  • Upload

Some great contrast, grain and tones from the Kentmere 400. I scan my film at 300DPI and for this particular roll I used the delta negafix profile as it provided good results from the highlights and shaddow. I used the Canon AE-1 for this roll of film with a 50mm prime lens. The camera handled well, for its age there was no light bleed on the roll of film. I noticed when scanning/in post that the negatives are a little darker, the camera meter may be suggesting an exposure that is under by a stop or so. I will test this further in upcoming shoots.

I found the manual focus on the old FD lens exceptionally smooth and quick to use. The manual film wind coupled with the retro look and feel of the AE-1 gave a very enjoyable shooting experience. I would highly recommend this camera!

Ilford Pan 100 pushed to 200

It has been a long time since I uploaded to this blog, my first post in over 3 years is Ilford Pan 100 pushed to 200. Developed myself. Details are below….

  • Rodinol developer 1+25 for 13 minutes at 20º. Agitate for 30 seconds then agitate every 30s for 30s
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+19 for 1 minute at 20º Agitate for 30 seconds then agitate every 30s for 10s
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4 for 9 minutes at 20º Agitate for 30 seconds then agitate every 30s for 10s
  • Wash with cold water for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol wetting agent 1+400 (deionised water) for 1 min at 20º Agitate continuously
  • Leave to dry for 2 hours
  • Scan at 300dpi using Plustek 8200i
  • Crop in Lightroom
  • Remove dust marks in post
  • Curves
  • Upload

Ilford XP2 Super 400

No pushing or pulling, shot straight out of the box. With a little bit of love.

Ilford XP2 Super 400 is the second film I shot at London Pride 2014. The streets were once again alive and buzzing, by this time of the day i’d had a fair bit to drink and was definitely enjoying the evening!

I have said this a lot over the past year but Ilford always performs well. This film has an excellent tonal range and really bites in the shadows whilst holding on to details. The highlights are given a glow by the grain softening them.

The 400 speed SP2 has a much larger and higher grain value compared to other 400 speed films such as Kodak TMAX or BW400CN that boast a super fine grain at high speed. That being said, the ‘rugged’, grainy look is something that I love about Ilford.

Agfa Vista APX Plus 200

After the success of last years London Pride, I decided this year I would walk the streets in the Parade/March. Of course bringing my camera along as it’s also around the ‘anniversary’ of me starting this blog.

For most of the march I stayed alongside some of the members of my boxing club that also walked this year. Braving the rain throughout the day we started at Baker Street and finished at Whitehall.

It looks like my negative scanner is on the fritz as it’s starting to develop some lines across the images (upon closer inspection) and colour casts, nothing overly drastic, but a little frustrating and adds processing time to the photographs. Quite possibly this may also be a result of the developer used, so is something I must look into.

The Agfa Vista has quite a lot of grain for a lower iso film. Out of the box delivers average results from an average class film. Personally I don’t rate it very highly, there are other colour films out there that give much more interesting results.

That being said I haven’t pushed or pulled this film yet so I can only pass comment on the selection of images that i’ve produced and not for the entire production line of Agfa Vista.

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ADOX Color Implosion 100ISO

The 35mm Project has been lacking some colour lately! Finally after quite a bit of waiting (an error on my part) the gorgeous Adox Color Implosion shot out of the box at 100ISO during the sunnier (and warmer) spell of weather the UK had, about two weeks ago arrived today. Filling me with so much excitement and glee I could of squealed. This film has shot right up to one of my favourite films for its unique take on reality, strong grain and texture.

Color Implosion is an astonishingly high grain film at a low ISO. Resulting in some extreme saturation in parts of the images (reds) that give a punchier and crisper image. Throughout the image there is a mixture of various tones and nuances that can be seen when at a higher magnification, there is a strong presence of red across the entire film.

200%

200 Percent Magnification

The grain is not intrusive and I believe gives this film a true individuality and separation from other colour films. Where the grain most works is on the wild life photographs taken at The Wetlands Park in London. However not totally disregarding the other photographs which have their own texture from the grain.

Having gone through a standard C-41 process the trickiest part was scanning the negative into my computer. Silverfast does not have a colour profile for Adox, and I have the cheaper (box version software) that came with my scanner so I am unable to make my own profiles. Instead I used the Fuji Pro 160s profile as I felt this gave a good CCR (Colour Cast Removal) and profiled the photographs well enough for post work.

White balance set from white point. Assuming that this film should have a white balance to white. I should note there was an exceptionally strong colour cast over the photographs when scanning. As I haven’t seen what these images ‘should’ look like after being printed from an enlarger onto light sensitive paper it was difficult to tell exactly how much to remove (and whether a cast of some sort is inherant of this film type) Google searching didn’t help so I decided I didn’t feel anything was gained in the images by allowing strong colour casts, as a result I have developed my own style of images with this film.

 

Zenit 12S USSR Camera

Dear readers

I have discovered on my travels a very unique Zenit 12S USSR Camera that resembles a machine gun! Trust the USSR to make something so … USSR! The camera is pretty bulky and when the gun attachment is attached to the camera it becomes ridiculous to see and to use.

If you’re planning on visiting the beach this summer and taking photographs of the kids for your family album i’d make sure to be ready for the local police to come and swarm the area before taking this out! Enough about that, after sussing out the dials and buttons i came to the conclusion that it’s astonishingly heavy and very slow and cumbersome to use.

Towards the front there is a large chrome screw mechanism that winds the zoom in/out. Due to the size of the dial and comparative size of the zoom mechanism it is, suffice to say frustrating and painstakingly slow to move and adjust. The central dial is used to screw the lens onto the gun attachment for the camera, which has a cable release cord to attach to the camera so when you depress the trigger it fires a frame respectively.

Storage is a bonus! Coming in it’s own military style metal container with filters, lenses and various screwdrivers and attachments so that you can adjust the camera and change features. When you’re finished with the camera it can be neatly bolted into the container. Lovely.

Although awkward to use and ultimately a strange camera i was amazed at it’s bold design. I feel that without the gun attachment and possibly with the smaller lens it would be great to take out and trial. The mechanics seemed in tip top working condition too so this is definitely a well preserved piece of equipment.