Found Archive: Konica Centuria 200

This collection of photographs is from the year 2000. It is the house I lived in with my parents from age 10 to when I moved out at 22. The images show the property during renovation.

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Found Archive: Fuji HG 100

A collection of photographs from the Found Archive project I have working on.

This roll of film was shot in 1992 by Michael Chippington. It is from a family holiday. One of my favourite photographs from this collection is my sister and I bouncing on a trampoline – i would liken the style of photograph to the work of Martin Parr and his seasides in the 80s

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Found Archive: Fuji HG 200

The Found Archive was created by using the images taken by my father Michael Chippington during the 1980s to early 2000s. In his younger years he was a keen photographer and has a good eye. Michael typically captured events in our family lives, our outings, our friends, gatherings and so on.

The negatives had been stored in a fireproof box for years and some showed signs of wear. During the archival process I scanned the negatives but also transferred them to an archival folder and negative sleeves.

It has taken me one year to scan his negatives – around 2500 images. The photographs were scanned using a Plustek OpticFilm 8100 at 6×4 300ppi. I am presenting the images with dust, scratches and all imperfections. There has been a removal of colour casts from scanning and also white balance adjustment. However – during this colour correction stage I have used the photograph prints or the same film from online to ensure I have not introduced colours that are a misrepresentation of the film properties.

This particular roll of film is from 1991 and features my sister and I with family members at Christmas.

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Update & Found Archive

Update:

A few months ago two things happened in a short space of time which has brought my posts to a grinding halt on The 35mm Project. First I dropped my C-41 colour chemicals on the floor because the wardrobe shelf collapsed … I was storing the bleach, stabiliser and developer in 3 x 1 L glass bottles on the top shelf (rookie mistake) and as you can imagine it made a pretty epic…BOOM! Smashed glass and brown shitty chemicals all over my floor.

I screamed a few expletives and my partner come running in to the room wondering what I had done…I cleaned up the mess and decided to purchase some plastic chemical storage bottles for future C-41 processing and changed the location of all my gear from the top shelf to the bottom shelf. Lesson learned! Unfortunately It had been a while since developing colour film and the concentrated chemicals had spoilt, separating into a weird goo with flakes in. Boo! I am going to hang off ordering more Tetenal until I have around 30 rolls of film to develop otherwise I wouldn’t be cost or environmentally conscious! Luckily even exposed film can be stored for a significant amount of time when kept cold in the fridge.

Secondly my 9 year old MacBook Pro died! It had been on it’s way out for a while but this time it was non repairable :(. I decided to replace it but wanted to pay off some debt first. So fast forward from March to July and I have a new MacBook, I am back online and almost near completion of a project I have been working on for around a year…

The Found Archive:

Around a year ago I started scanning the negatives of photographs my father took between the 1980’s to the early 2000’s of my family, our holidays, friends and various events in our lives. The catalogue of images he captured looks back at our younger years through his eyes. It is nostalgic for me not only to reflect on my childhood but also to review the old film that one can no longer purchase.

To date I have scanned 2,265 frames from an assortment of 24 and 36 exposure film. The negatives when I received them had been stored in a metal fireproof box in their original holder from the print labs my father used many years ago. There was a few times when handling the negatives I winced at the lab gluing paper along the side of frames which I had to carefully remove so as not to damage the image. Since inheriting the negatives I have cleaned them, archived them in sleeves and store them in a well made photographic archival binder. Interestedly the camera that I am shooting with today is the same camera that my father used for most of the photographs during this period of time (released 1987), a Canon EOS 620.

I am now in the final stages of my project – scanning the final photographs, cropping and preparing them for upload and giving the original prints away to my family members. I hope you enjoy viewing the photos when I upload them as much as I have scanning them.

Brad

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Ilford HP5

 

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Fuji Natura 1600

This is the first time I have shot colour film rated at 1600 and I am blown away by the fine grain at a high ISO.

Canon EOS 620, F/2.8. Kew Gardens, London.

Canon EOS 620, F/4. Kew Gardens, London.

Canon EOS 620, F/16. Kew Gardens, London.

Develop:

I have yet to receive my thermometer which goes to 38ºc and beyond (for standard develop and rapid develop) so I am doing a slower develop. I have read online there can be colour shift and the yellows/cyans not as strong however (as of yet) I have not experienced any problems.

Warm bath 30º for 5m
Develop 30ºc +-0.5ºc for 8m
Bleach 30ºc +-1.0ºc for 6m
Rinse 30ºc – 40ºc for 6m
Stab 20ºc – 40ºc for 1m
Hang to dry with Patterson neg clips for 2 hours (use squeegee lightly to remove excess water, be careful of tram lines)

During scanning there was a colour cast leaning towards red. This was adjusted in post along with cleaning, curves and saturation.

I have noticed there is more cleaning in Photoshop required on my developed colour film than the black and white. I think this is because of the final process and the water used. In black and white after fixing there is a 10 minute wash, after that I use a wetting agent with deionised water. The wetting agent reduces grime on the negative and deionised water will ensure there aren’t any mineral marks left behind once dried.

On my first C-41 mix of chemicals I followed the instructions word for word and used water from the tap. However next time I will use deionised water for the final stage (STAB) so that there is a low chance of mineral residue on left on the negative once dried.

Canon EOS 620, F/2.8. Colchester.

See the full gallery below.

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Lomography 100 Color Print Film

Prelude to colour:

Since starting The 35mm Project in 2013 I have sent all my colour film to labs, but over the last eight months I have had some great results with black and white since taking the time to really understand the development process and what I want from film. My negatives have never looked better and with every process, push, pull or out of the box I am learning. Now, I want to explore colour processing to hone my skills further, to save money and to see (if any) what difference in quality there is between my negatives and the labs I once used. I am interested in good results and bad results, colour shift, colour cast, what mistakes I make and what affect it has on the photograph, will it change the image for better, or worse? Lets explore!!!

Step 1: Receiving the goodies!

Contents of photograph: Tetenal C-41 kit, 3 x 1 litre brown chemical storage, 2 x 1000ml jugs, 2 x 600ml beakers, 1 x 150ml beaker, Ilford stop bath, Ilford rapid fixer, Rodinol R09, Hama Negative Storage, 2 x Patterson negative clips, scissors, cleaning equipment, syringes, development tank, 2 x spools, negative cleaning alcohol, thermometer, chamois, microfibre cloth, agitator, eyepiece. All equipment purchased from Silverprint.

Most of the items in the photograph above I already had but today (05/06/18) I received a pack of Tetenal C-41 Developing Kit. YAZOOOO!

Step 2: Setting up

Setting up the gear was easy! I followed a similar process to YouTuber Wild We Roam and also referred to YouTuber The Art of Photography. I would check both these guys out, their process is simple to follow and informative.

I labelled the bottles with steps so the chemicals aren’t mixed and it’s easier for me when concentrating on temperatures and timing. It’s important to keep the chemicals away from one another, especially bleach to developer as the bleach will neutralise the developer and stop it from working. A 2.5L pack of Tetenal will develop around 30-40 rolls of film and last around 6 months from the date of being opened. I will process 14 rolls per 1/L of solution and 7 rolls in the final 500ml solution over the next few months.

Labels stuck on to the side of jar. Printed.

 

Highlighted 1L mix

 

Small chart in Tetenal instructions to keep track of the mix and films used with it. Development times increase after every 4th film used at 1L mixture ratio.

I mixed the chemicals following the guidelines in the Tetenal instruction booklet. The temperature requires great accuracy with a maximum deviancy of +-.05ºc for development. +-1ºc for the bleach fix and between 30-40 degrees for Stab & Rinse. Unfortunately just before starting the development process I realised my thermometer doesn’t go above 30ºc! The Tetenal instructions do have a development process at a lower temp (usual being 38ºc) however there may be some colour shift.

Eager to try the kit out and unable to wait for a thermometer with a larger range I decided to develop 1 of the 3 rolls of Lomography 100 I have shot at the lower 30ºc temperature to see how the development is affected compared to 38ºc. I used a bucket filled with water with a temp of around 33ºc (slight guess as there was no markings past 30ºc on the thermometer) to keep the chemicals warm. While the chemicals were warming I turned the lights out and loaded the film on to a spool.

Step 3: Develop

Stage 1 of development is a warm water bath for the negative for five minutes, during this time I kept checking the developer temp to ensure if stayed at 30ºc. The development times are pre-set by Tetenal however the agitation times are my own:

Water bath & pre heat developer tank 30ºc for 05:00m
Developer 30ºc for 08:00m (agitate for 15s every minute)
Bleach Fix 30ºc for 06:00m (agitate for 15s every minute)
Rinse around 33ºc for 06:00 (acceptable range of 30ºc – 40ºc change water every 30s)
Stabilizer 30ºc for 01:00m (acceptable range of 20ºc – 40ºc)

Processing in the bath.

Step 4: The moment of truth….

Step 5: Scan, Clean, Upload

There aren’t any predefined settings on Silverfast for Lomo 100 but I found the Fuji Superia 100 settings to work the best for this type of film. Images were scanned using a Plustek Opticfilm 8200i 35mm scanner with Silverfast 8. Scanned as PSD and imported to Lightroom & Photoshop. Images were spot, dust and scratch removal at 100%. Cropped to 6×4 ratio. No sharpening. I wanted to retain as much of the original negative colour and sharpness (otherwise, what is the point?).

Camden Market f/2.8 Canon EOS 620

It is times like this when I see a negative that I have developed myself and think “why did I not do this from the beginning?”. Honestly! Everyone should develop their own film, the results are far superior than that of any lab I have ever sent film to. The negative is well developed, colours are consistent and it was extremely fun!

London f/4 Canon EOS 620

Have a look at the gallery below to see more.

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