Kodak Portra 400

Brad sitting at the Wetland Centre. Photo credit: James Wakelin

A Fresh Start

The first roll of colour film I developed at home for this blog was Lomography Colour 100 with Tetenal C-41. The results were pretty good and I wondered why friends in the photography community always claimed colour was more tricky…I agree one must be very precise with water temperature during processing but as long as you set up a good workflow you minimise risk of problems.

At the beginning a rookie mistake I made was storing chemicals in glass bottles on the top shelf of my wardrobe instead of plastic bottles on the bottom shelf. Unfortunately the shelf gave out from the weight which smashed everything on the floor…whoops! More about that can be read here.

Another mistake I made was not knowing colour chemicals do not stay fresh for very long once mixed (6 weeks), the concentrate gives you 12 weeks though, added to the 6 weeks after mixing is another 24 weeks. I tried mixing another 1000ml after the end use date and the bleach fix turned into a yellow lumpy cheese like goop. Not good.

Tetenal can process around 30-40 rolls of film so these two mistakes are an expensive lesson to learn. At the time I didn’t have the money or free time to invest in 40 rolls of film to shoot – I was looking for a new job and had a lot of changes happening in life.

I regularly wrap paper around my film telling me what is on the roll for a later date when i process.

Fast forward to Autumn 2019 and in 3 months i’ve shot 20 rolls of film to develop and will be ordering some more for a short trip away in October – so fingers crossed I should hit that 30-40 number making things way more cost efficient.

Mixing Tetenal C41 developer.

How I develop

Follow the instructions in the Tetenal guide – they’re fool proof and super easy! Each time I develop a roll of film I tally up the guide to track the life of each mix. The development and bleach times are extended depending on how many rolls you have developed or if you are push processing.

Everyones workflow will vary but i’ve found that if I fill a bowl with water to around 50ºc the heat transfer warms up the chemicals with enough time during cooling to 38ºc to load the film to the spools & development tank. Once the bowl temperature reaches 39ºc I start a 5 minute film bath at 38ºc (water taken straight from tap and temp measured using thermometer). By the time I have finished preheating the film the temperature in the bowl and my chemicals are 38ºc exactly.

I always put the development tank in to the bowl to keep the temperature up and I regularly check with a thermometer! If it starts dropping below 38ºc I top up the warm bath with hot water to a couple of degrees higher to keep the chemicals at 38ºc.

Scanning:

Once the negatives have dried they are cut in to a strips of 6 frames and placed in an archival box. I use industry standard archiving from when I was working as a retoucher – date backwards, followed by job number, then by product, and client or location. Underscores are used instead of spacing. So the latest project is always at the bottom of the list. For example the roll of film for this blog post is 19090601_KODAK_PORTRA_400_LONDON_WETLAND_CENTRE

The job number goes up depending on how many jobs I have that day. This is handy if i’m with the same client but on a different shoot or location or batch. I.e 19060101_PORTRA, 19060102_PORTRA, 19060103_PORTRA, etc etc etc

I scan my negatives flat without adjustments or sharpening using a Plustek Opticfilm 8100 at 3600 dpi which produces a 50mb file at 3300 x 4968. The scanner can do up to 7200dpi however the scan time is too slow and I don’t require that much data for web use. If I ever print the images I would rescan at 7200dpi and reprocess for print. The images are saved as PSD’s which increases their compatibility with Lightroom and Photoshop. Lightroom is my main tool for global adjustments such as colour, cropping and batch processing. Macro adjustments and cleaning are done in Photoshop.

London Wetland Centre

This roll of Kodak Portra 400 has been processed with warmer tone that I feel reflects the warmth of the summer day I shot it on.

Limehouse to Camden Canal Walk

Lewisham twilight

These photographs are some test shots I took for a future post about Reciprocity Failure.

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Found Archive: Konica VX 200

I uploaded these pictures from a family holiday to the Isle of Wight in 1996 a few days ago however I didn’t give much thought to adding some of the memories I have. The thing is I can’t help but look at these images and feel they deserve more than a silent corner of the internet to sit on for an eternity.

On the run up to our first family holiday my mother was sharing stories with my sister and I from when she went to the Isle of Wight as a child. She loved the model villages and Blackgang Chine. She spoke of it very fondly and I recall on our visit walking around part of the island that she had explained to us – she pointed out areas that had eroded away over the years, areas that she once explored. We travelled in a caravan and stayed on a local field. The owner had an old Vardo (gypsy caravan) pulled by a shire horse. Every morning he would cook his breakfast on an open fire. My dad would walk over and say hello, eat with him and no doubt have a few moments away from screaming children running around the caravan and fields (my sister and I)!

During the night the wind and rain would thrash the side of the caravan – I worried it would roll down the hill! But during the day the weather was always warm and clear. One day we took an overhead open cable car down the side of the cliffs of the island. I sat with my dad; our legs dangling down. He swore a few times as the trees and land disappeared beneath us. When we reached the bottom we took a boat to The Needles, after returning to shore we collected some coloured sands.

We visited model villages, shore lines, little towns and villages. It was a great family holiday for kids and parents.

Found Archive: Kodak Gold 100

Being so young at the time these were taken I do not know some of the people in these photographs. However they were taken in a small town called Brightlingsea on the Essex Coast during the 1980s. These photos are of my Aunts, Sister, Mother, Great Grandmother and Cousin – oh and the happy baby is me!

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Found Archive: Fuji Super G 200

The photographs in this collection are from the first day we bought a puppy in 1996. In these photographs we have my mother, two sisters and our puppy Bonnie.

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Found Archive: Kodak Gold 200

This collection of photographs is from the year 1989 along the Norfolk Broads.

Found Archive: Konica Centuria 200

This collection of photographs is from the year 2000. It is the house I lived in with my parents from age 10 to when I moved out at 22. The images show the property during renovation.

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Found Archive: Fuji HG 100

A collection of photographs from the Found Archive project I have working on.

This roll of film was shot in 1992 by Michael Chippington. It is from a family holiday. One of my favourite photographs from this collection is my sister and I bouncing on a trampoline – i would liken the style of photograph to the work of Martin Parr and his seasides in the 80s

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