Travelling

I am leaving the UK for about a year to travel around Asia with my backpack and camera. See you in the future with more film reviews!

Thank you for your support on this blog. Please also take the time to visit my main website http://www.bradleychippington.co.uk

Thank you

Brad

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Ilford XP2 Super 400

No pushing or pulling, shot straight out of the box. With a little bit of love.

Ilford XP2 Super 400 is the second film I shot at London Pride 2014. The streets were once again alive and buzzing, by this time of the day i’d had a fair bit to drink and was definitely enjoying the evening!

I have said this a lot over the past year but Ilford always performs well. This film has an excellent tonal range and really bites in the shadows whilst holding on to details. The highlights are given a glow by the grain softening them.

The 400 speed SP2 has a much larger and higher grain value compared to other 400 speed films such as Kodak TMAX or BW400CN that boast a super fine grain at high speed. That being said, the ‘rugged’, grainy look is something that I love about Ilford.

Agfa Vista APX Plus 200

After the success of last years London Pride, I decided this year I would walk the streets in the Parade/March. Of course bringing my camera along as it’s also around the ‘anniversary’ of me starting this blog.

For most of the march I stayed alongside some of the members of my boxing club that also walked this year. Braving the rain throughout the day we started at Baker Street and finished at Whitehall.

It looks like my negative scanner is on the fritz as it’s starting to develop some lines across the images (upon closer inspection) and colour casts, nothing overly drastic, but a little frustrating and adds processing time to the photographs. Quite possibly this may also be a result of the developer used, so is something I must look into.

The Agfa Vista has quite a lot of grain for a lower iso film. Out of the box delivers average results from an average class film. Personally I don’t rate it very highly, there are other colour films out there that give much more interesting results.

That being said I haven’t pushed or pulled this film yet so I can only pass comment on the selection of images that i’ve produced and not for the entire production line of Agfa Vista.

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ADOX Color Implosion 100ISO

The 35mm Project has been lacking some colour lately! Finally after quite a bit of waiting (an error on my part) the gorgeous Adox Color Implosion shot out of the box at 100ISO during the sunnier (and warmer) spell of weather the UK had, about two weeks ago arrived today. Filling me with so much excitement and glee I could of squealed. This film has shot right up to one of my favourite films for its unique take on reality, strong grain and texture.

Color Implosion is an astonishingly high grain film at a low ISO. Resulting in some extreme saturation in parts of the images (reds) that give a punchier and crisper image. Throughout the image there is a mixture of various tones and nuances that can be seen when at a higher magnification, there is a strong presence of red across the entire film.

200%

200 Percent Magnification

The grain is not intrusive and I believe gives this film a true individuality and separation from other colour films. Where the grain most works is on the wild life photographs taken at The Wetlands Park in London. However not totally disregarding the other photographs which have their own texture from the grain.

Having gone through a standard C-41 process the trickiest part was scanning the negative into my computer. Silverfast does not have a colour profile for Adox, and I have the cheaper (box version software) that came with my scanner so I am unable to make my own profiles. Instead I used the Fuji Pro 160s profile as I felt this gave a good CCR (Colour Cast Removal) and profiled the photographs well enough for post work.

White balance set from white point. Assuming that this film should have a white balance to white. I should note there was an exceptionally strong colour cast over the photographs when scanning. As I haven’t seen what these images ‘should’ look like after being printed from an enlarger onto light sensitive paper it was difficult to tell exactly how much to remove (and whether a cast of some sort is inherant of this film type) Google searching didn’t help so I decided I didn’t feel anything was gained in the images by allowing strong colour casts, as a result I have developed my own style of images with this film.

 

Zenit 12S USSR Camera

Dear readers

I have discovered on my travels a very unique Zenit 12S USSR Camera that resembles a machine gun! Trust the USSR to make something so … USSR! The camera is pretty bulky and when the gun attachment is attached to the camera it becomes ridiculous to see and to use.

If you’re planning on visiting the beach this summer and taking photographs of the kids for your family album i’d make sure to be ready for the local police to come and swarm the area before taking this out! Enough about that, after sussing out the dials and buttons i came to the conclusion that it’s astonishingly heavy and very slow and cumbersome to use.

Towards the front there is a large chrome screw mechanism that winds the zoom in/out. Due to the size of the dial and comparative size of the zoom mechanism it is, suffice to say frustrating and painstakingly slow to move and adjust. The central dial is used to screw the lens onto the gun attachment for the camera, which has a cable release cord to attach to the camera so when you depress the trigger it fires a frame respectively.

Storage is a bonus! Coming in it’s own military style metal container with filters, lenses and various screwdrivers and attachments so that you can adjust the camera and change features. When you’re finished with the camera it can be neatly bolted into the container. Lovely.

Although awkward to use and ultimately a strange camera i was amazed at it’s bold design. I feel that without the gun attachment and possibly with the smaller lens it would be great to take out and trial. The mechanics seemed in tip top working condition too so this is definitely a well preserved piece of equipment.

Kentmere 100 Pushed 400

How else can i start this blog than with … wow! What a film!

I’ve never used Kentmere before and this was actually the third time i had loaded it in my camera. “Third time?” you cry … well, i loaded it in and went from shooting outdoors to indoors in very low light so wound the film up and replaced it for some Kodak TMAX P3200. The second time i replaced it for Rollei and now, finally we have Kentmere.

The quality of the images are fantastic, this film loves to be pushed! Outside, the film is acceptable. Shadows and lights are fairly even. The squirrel was a friendly guy! Letting me get about 1 foot from him. However inside is where this film (for me) excelled. I visited Westminster Cathedral during the last few frames and managed to capture some great scenes with the light spilling in. The added contrast and grain from the push in my opinion enhances the haze and feel of the Cathedral.

The only concern is the marks that have been left on the film. It looks like light has spilt into the roll somehow. Changing the roll a few times before actually shooting the entire roll is probably the cause. However i have left the images in as i find the effect an interesting addition to this post.

Rollei Infrared 400s pushed to 800

Over the last week i have made it my mission to get some film shot, it had been a while as i had started to use digital again for events, interiors and project work.

So the weather is improving and the summer may finally be upon us! (As i write this it’s getting darker and colder….hmmm) I have finished my dissertation and now full steam ahead into my Final Major Project. I’ve developed a project based on domestic violence with men. I had a radio interview this afternoon promoting the campaign and awareness. Please take a look at www.invisiblecampaign.com 

There was initially some problems with the developing of this film. The developer used with this film (Neotinol) isn’t listed with Rollei on Digital Truth so there was a bit of confusion with the dev times. Neotinol is similar to TMAX and DT rate it a 2ASA and 25ASA (mine is massively underexposed from those) which would relate to 12 min and 7 1/2 mins dev times respectively.

After a bit of umming and arring a clip test of 18 minutes was carried out to see the results and the images turned out fantastic, the rest of the film was then developed with an extra couple of minutes on top.

The results are great! The only thing i am getting a bit frustrated about is the lack of profiles with the negative scanner software SilverFast. I wish that it was possible to create complex customisable profiles. I am considering printing the photographs from the negatives to light sensitive paper and then scanning them on a flat bed scanner to see if the results are different. Of course scanning onto light sensitive paper will (in my opinion) always create a much better result than scanning digitally, i am more interested in how the properties of the paper will be read by the scanner rather than of the negative.

For this roll i used a mixture of Kodak BW+ 400 and Kodak TMAX and TRI-X for the profiles to use. Each profile gave varied results but i decided on the profile which gave the best range from lows to lights.

An interesting mix of highlights and shadows in this roll of film, as i didn’t use an IR filter or any special treatments the film remains relatively normal to look at. The highlights are smooth and have a soft glow to them which improves overall image quality. The shadows are deep and retain good detail, there is a fairly good contrast which is no doubt because of the push and post production work.

Whilst shooting the film i had a bit of an obsession with walls and people around them. The entire film consists of people interacting around walls however these where the images that made it to the final edit.

‘Invisible’ Male Domestic Violence Campaign

Hi everyone!

Apologies I have been so busy lately i haven’t been shooting any film, i do however have a roll of Infrared 400s thats ready to be developed + scanned + uploaded so that will be coming shortly.

Since my last post I have finished my dissertation and started a campaign for my Final Major Project at University which i hope you will support, share and provide any feedback. 🙂

You will get more information on the campaign on my main website www.bradleychippington.co.uk and on the Twitter page @Invisible_DV

Watch this space for the next post in about a week or so for Infrared 400s

Brad

Fomapan 400

Hi everyone

So much has happened over the past month, where do i begin! Okay, firstly i would like to wish all of you a huge Happy New Year (I know i’m a bit late). I hope you had a fantastic time eating too much over Christmas and drinking too much on New Years. I was being a model student and stayed in studying, i am now reaping the rewards of finishing my dissertation a month early which has freed up quite a bit of time, however i am back at University at full steam ahead with my final semester of my final year Advanced Major Project, eek!

At the beginning of January I had my Pride Exhibition at Gallery 1885 in Kennington, you can see back to some older posts where there are some more details on how the Exhibition went and the process involved, needless to say i thoroughly enjoyed the experience and i’m eager to get another one on the go!

Probably a blessing in disguise this month was loosing my job, at the time didn’t realise how much time working for my previous employer was being taken out of my week from enhancing my own photography business and developing my personal projects. Now with the free time i have managed to search and apply for many areas of photography and retouching services as well as develop my own business, update my websites and finally finish the roll of film i had loaded into my camera.

The black and white film from Fomapan has a relatively good grain for 400ISO. Although in comparison to Kodak who over the years have mastered fine grain at a higher ISO, leaves Fomapan lagging behind. There is also a lacking crispness to the photos, leaving them softer than others i have used on The 35mm Project, even the Ilford Delta 3200 pushed to 12,800 appears to have a sharper finish than the Fomapan.

The softness of the film however does not leave me unimpressed, in fact, i am quite impressed with Fomapan, especially as the softness benefits the photographs of the fog covering the houses and the people walking through tunnels. This film leaves me wanting more out of the softness, in future i will shoot using purposefully out of focus settings to create a collection of photographs much like a ghost on the image. There is photographer who’s images i can see in my head but name escapes me, when i remember i will add his name to this post as it enhances what i am talking about.